The End of Labels

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The End of Labels

When I was in high school, all I wanted was a Louis Vuitton bag. As much monogram as someone would give me, I wanted. In my adolescent mind, they were worn exclusively by chic women with a glamorous sense of style and the bank account to support it – i.e., far from my situation.

By the time I reached semi-adulthood (i.e., I was making my own money and spending it to buy things), my obsession with monogram had fallen by the wayside along with my college eating habits. But I still lusted after silhouettes and “IT” bags, for much the same reason I wanted that monogram long ago.

Albeit subconscious, I wanted everyone to see my bag and associate me with the aforementioned ladies. Period.

Society told me that buying something quality or of value was nothing if everyone else didn’t know about it. So the bigger the label the better. The more LV’s you could fit in a square inch, the more valuable. I bought into it. For years, I called Barney’s looking for Celine bags that were sold out, tried to predict which Fendi would be the big hit and dug through sites like The Real Real for castoffs.

My closet is full of bags and pieces that wear a time-stamp. A definitive mark. Much like a song on the radio, I can tell you what year they came out based solely on my memories of the trends during which I bought them.

Perhaps it’s my age or maybe times are actually a-changing, but looking back on the whole thing, the practice feels sort of gauche.

My preferences these days are to buy quality for the sake of having something that is good quality. (Novel, I know.) And while self-expression is king, discovering new designers and unique pieces has replaced my need to let others know where I bought something without even the tiniest of conversations (the irony of me wearing this jacket while writing about this bag is not lost on me).

For years, labels were the name of the game. In fact, a girl couldn’t even find a carryall without the designer stamped across it like a literal brand. But, thanks to new designers like Sarah White and the rise of minimalists like Mansur Gavriel, labels are making their way to the back of the bus and clearing a path for a luxury that is no ones but yours.

I for one, look forward to more conversations about pieces that don’t start with, “When did you get that <insert brand here>…?

 

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Perhaps it’s my age or maybe times are actually a-changing, but looking back on the whole thing, the practice feels sort of gauche.

In the post:

jacket: Opening Ceremony  |  turtleneck: J. Crew  |  denim: Victoria Beckham  |  belt: LOFT  |  mules: Alexander Wang (old; similar here)  |  backpack: Sarah White

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